Natural Born Movers® Mother’s Day Edition

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mom on bike

Lois on the road

Out shopping for a Mother’s Day card this week, I realized that I found the selection somewhat disappointing.  All seemed to be along the lines of the Martyrdom of Motherhood variety — you know the themes, thanks for giving everything to us and nothing to yourself, pastels and flowers, etc.  I was looking for one more like, “Hey Mom, I think it’s neat you’re a bad ass“.  Of course my mom did all the traditional things you associate with motherhood for us. We don’t call her the MacGyver of Motherhood for nothing– she can cook, knit, build, sew, repair, finagle or haggle for anything you need. She is not, however, a booboo kisser (thanks Dad for picking up the slack in that area). Her many talents would require an additional post.

Here at Move It Media, we celebrate Natural Born Movers®, so I thought it would be a good time to check in with Mom about her athletic endeavors.  I had to schedule an interview as she has a full day of college courses on the day I tried to connect.  She typically takes a few courses each semester and loves to joke that her GPA is so high because she was “sleeping with the Dean” (that’s my Dad by the way, now retired–and he will be mortified that I wrote that, but it’s Mother’s Day, not Father’s Day, and she will love it).

What’s your course load this semester?:

6 credits — Yoga, Pilates, Water exercise, and Ceramics.  (editor’s note:  what are you doing talking to me–isn’t this finals week?  Get studying!)

H and Gma bike ride

Heading out with Grandson to ride the length of the Erie Canal #Grandparentlikeaboss

Tell us about your upcoming cycling trip:

This summer I’ll be riding a self-contained bicycle trip with my sister, Janie.  We’ll be some senior ladies out on the road.  We plan to leave from Lansing then head west to Ludington.  We’ll take the ferry across Lake Michigan, turn north and head up through Wisconsin. Head east across the UP, cross the Mackinac Bridge and head back down the state to Lansing–about 1500 miles.  We are planning to travel for 5 weeks, camping along the way. We could do it in a much shorter time, but there are several breweries we want to hit.  Who knows, we may never get out of Michigan.

Lois & Janie High Ropes

Lois & Janie on High Ropes course

Since this is a Mother’s Day post, what do you think your mom would think of that?:

I think she would be excited about it.  She wouldn’t do something like that, but she’d support us doing it.  She would be absolutely excited to see us doing it together.  She wanted to live long enough to see us getting along, which she did.

What’s your favorite cycling trip you’ve done?:

My favorite was from Baytown, TX to Sault Ste. Marie Michigan.  Turned out to be 2400 miles.  Along the way we saw great stuff Natchez Trace Mississippi — loved the great roads and history in that area.  We rode to Owosso, MI for my 50th high school class reunion along the way. Then we hooked up with the DALMAC ride to get from Lansing to Sault Ste. Marie.  I’d been planning to do a cross country ride from East to West (of the U.S) and it got cancelled, so we made this one up.  (editor’s note:  read about that trip here).

mom and dad bridge

 

What made you get into cycling:

I’ve always had a bicycle.  One time your Dad thought that I should be riding and he bought me a bike and we just did casual rides.  I was out riding my bike and I was challenged by Dr. Tom Seabourne at Northeast Texas College to do the Texas Chain Ring Challenge.  That was my first organized ride.  I started tour cycling at age 53.  I went on the ride and loved it.  I’m 73 now.  I plan to ride as long as I can.

Does it bother you that one of your sons-in-law (the Swede, not the Aussie) calls you the L Train?:

Haha, no.  Only the people that care about you give you nicknames.  I don’t like it when he calls me LoLo, but it’s still polite, just don’t care for it.

Peter & the L Train

The Swede and the L Train

Happy Mother’s Day, Mom.  It’s neat that you’re a bad ass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

3 Cool tools for citizen centered health promotion & health in all policies

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My work building Healthy Community Zones with Urban Health Partnerships and the TOUCH initiative in Broward County is in full swing.  Working with transportation engineers, city and county leadership, health care professionals, education leaders, law enforcement, and most importantly, residents, we’ve been busy conducting Walking Audits and extensive data gathering to connect and build upon existing plans.

A huge thank you to the host organizations for your time and effort to coordinate these events in a very short time L A Lee YMCA (Ft. Lauderdale), Austin Hepburn Center (Hallandale Beach), C W Thomas Park (Dania Beach), and Delevoe Park (Broward County Municipal Services District).

Up next the building of Community Action Plans that will guide work for the next two years and beyond.  Follow TOUCH Broward on Facebook  and on Twitter @TOUCHBroward for lots of photos. Here’s what it looks like in action:

 

Citizen centered health promotion policy development in action. Photo credits to Beny Schonfeld.

Citizen centered health promotion policy development in action. Photo credits to Beny Schonfeld.

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You know people are committed when they show up for Walking Audits in the mid-afternoon South Florida August heat!!

As we begin tackling the Community Action Plan building phase, a great resource is the leader in Health In All policies work, Change Lab Solutions.

ChangeLab Solutions provides community-based solutions for America’s most common and preventable diseases like cancer, heart disease, diabetes, obesity, and asthma. Our solutions promote the common good by making healthier choices easier for everyone.

Their graphic rich, brilliantly simple tools translate the complicated process of policy, system, and environmental change into tools for community action.  These are customizable and beautifully tie in the health in all policies framework into economic development and sustainability.  All tools are available at Change Lab Solutions with direct links below:

Presentation Make the case

Health In All Policies Guide Understand Health In All Policies implementation

Model Policies Tools for plan development

Our method for building Community Action Plans is based on tools from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and built with the necessary rigor to potentially secure implementation funding.  This is what we love, translating community goals into formalized plans that match the right funder to that effort.  The TOUCH Healthy Community Zones are on their way!

Time for Citizen Centered Health Promotion in Action

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It’s been an exciting two weeks building the Walking Assessments with our four newly designated Healthy Community Zones in Broward County, FL.  Read the press release for more.  We are mid-process in training walking audit facilitators, inviting community leaders, and creating all of the materials that support these events.

These community input sessions will build our Community Action Plans and advance the work that’s been happening for several years to build a healthy, more equitable community.  Can’t wait to see it all come together next week.

HCZ Program Logo (2)

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Builders Series: Lisa Peacock Florida’s First Coast (Jacksonville)

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LISA L. PEACOCK, ACSM- CPT, CHES

I am a huge fan of George Babish, Senior VP of Organizational Advancement, at the YMCA of Florida’s First Coast in Jacksonville, FL. The team of talent he has assembled to advance the healthy living portfolio is outstanding and a lot of fun to work with.  One of which is Lisa Peacock, Director of Healthy Living Innovations:  Chronic Disease Prevention.  A little talk with her about building healthy communities:

Me: Lisa, what is your current role?

Lisa: I focus on chronic disease prevention for the entire First Coast YMCA Association.  We serve 5 counties and 100,000 people through 13 locations.  I work with our signature programs.  I review recommendations coming from YUSA and make suggestions to our organization about which strategies we should implement and when.  I go out to our communities, listen and bring back to our leadership suggestions about how to best serve the needs of the people in those communities. I work with hospital and health care systems and partners in our Healthy Living Centers.

One of my projects includes the Healthy Living Centers at the Williams and Ponte Vedra Ys. The Healthy Living Centers are the first of their kind on the First Coast, bringing medically integrated programs from Baptist Health into the Y – and making these programs more accessible to the surrounding community. More Y Healthy Living Centers are planned in the near future. The flagship Healthy Living Center will be located at the new Riverside Y along with Brooks Rehabilitation and Florida Blue. Our vision: Healthy Living Centers are a community based initiative designed to increase personal engagement and accountability for health, making it easier for people to achieve and sustain a healthier lifestyle.

Part of my responsibility is also to advance our association strategy of developing the Y as a Total Wellness Resource. This includes the delivery of our Y signature programs such as the YMCAs Diabetes Prevention Program and Enhance®Fitness, as well as our adaptive wellness programs, in partnership with Brooks Rehabilitation Health Systems. These adaptive wellness programs are designed to help those with mobility impairments through supervised physical activity.  Through these programs, participants learn how to stay active and improve their health after they complete formal physical therapy.

Where we are going as an organization is exciting.  I’m really involved in changing the way the community works with and perceives the Y.  We are a vital part of the health of our community and the overall healthcare system.

Me:  What’s your biggest challenge?

Lisa:  Time. There are many potential programs to focus on and we lack the time to address them all. It takes a huge amount of time to do diligent research to ensure we develop programs that meet community need and, in the end, transforming the overall health of those participating in our programs. Everyone can think of a great idea/program—that’s the fun part.  But you have to take that idea through focus groups, beta testing, fine-tuning and adjusting in order to do it right.

Me:  Following up with that idea—how’d you keep your job?  You needed a lot of time to show the value of the work you’re doing to the Y organization…

Lisa:  I have a strong faith and pray frequently. Not in the sense of keeping my job, but in the sense of being able to provide what both the association and our communities need. As for keeping programs running, we are blessed to receive grant funding, at times, as we did to launch the YMCA’s Diabetes Prevention Program. This grant allowed one of our team members to focus on one program and really put the attention into the details of making the program succeed.  As a health educator, I highly value the concept of disease prevention & lifestyle behavior change. This allows me to speak from the heart about the great work we do. I can get behind an evidence-based program that is proven to work. During the time I was the YMCA’s Diabetes Prevention Program Coordinator, I felt that my organization really trusted my judgment and I was able to develop professionally as the subject matter expert.

We received the grant and began this work in 2010 and it was three years until we flipped the business model and began receiving reimbursement for the program from Florida Blue in 2013. They are now a third party reimbursement payer.  Without them, we would have a really nice feel good, proven program, but not a strong sustainable business model. Currently, all Florida Blue insured individuals have coverage for and access to the YMCA’s Diabetes Prevention Program. Florida Blue is also headquartered in Jacksonville, so this provides the opportunity to grow our partnership and improve the health of our community together as true local partners.

Me:  If you had more time (or budget) what would that buy you?

Lisa:  The additional time would buy me more organization and clarity. To have designated time to think, brainstorm with others, and research. To really navigate through and develop business plans. I have an amazing opportunity to work with some really great minds who challenge me. As a health educator, I don’t immediately think about the business model or financials. I would value more time to dive deep into this information and develop it further and to continue exploring how our organization can truly partner on holistic health outcomes.

Me:  Who do you admire inside or outside your industry?

Lisa: I enjoy listening to Heather Hodge Director, Chronic Disease Prevention Programs at YMCA of the USA.  It’s inspiring to hear what our national office is doing at a very high level with partnerships to advance our work.

There is an organization in our community, the New Town Successzone.  They are in a high-risk health zone. Their focus is revitalizing the community. What I value most, is who sits at the table – so many different organizations, of different backgrounds and races, all with the same focus, to better the community. It is very inspiring… I always leave the meeting uplifted.

#Walking Wednesday Greater Lansing Food Bank Resource Center

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This week’s Walking Wednesday took us to the Garden Resource Center with Julie Lehman, Garden Program Coordinator of the Greater Lansing Food Bank.

The Garden Project is one of its programs and the Resource Center is its hub.  When we visited on Wednesday it was full of neighbors picking up seeds, gardening information, starter plants, and food.  There were volunteers everywhere running the operation and working in the gardens.

 

Seeds

2401 Marcus St. Lansing, MI 48912

2401 Marcus St. Lansing, MI 48912

The facility is tucked into the south end of Foster Park Foster Park map(C on the map below–A is the Foster Community Center).

 

 

 

From the Resource Center you can see the traffic on both 127 to the East and 496 to the South, yet you are surrounded by green space and large community garden/urban farm projects.

Community gardens and home gardeners can register with the garden program and find a community of growers and support for their efforts.

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Just southwest of the Resource Center is the UrbandaleFarm.    Urbandale

Amazing the difference a sign makes!

Amazing the difference a sign makes!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you’re interested in home gardening, urban gardening, food access, healthy living/eating, or just meeting people who are thinking about these things are creating them in your community, stop in at the Resource Center and learn more.  Of course, donate to the Greater Lansing Food Bank to continue their support of these programs and services as we work together to eliminate hunger in our community.  Thank you Julie for your hospitality and we look forward to seeing the bounty of these gardens all summer long!

 

Whatdoyou

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Builders Series: Kristie King, National Kidney Foundation of Michigan

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The Builders Series profiles people hard at work building healthier communities.  Meet Kristie King of the National Kidney Foundation of Michigan http://www.nkfm.org/ Nominate someone for our next builder’s series profile in the comments below or connect with me on Twitter @andicrawford

Kristie King (kneeling L of center) w/ NKFM colleagues at the Enhance®Fitness Statewide Conference

Kristie King (kneeling L of center) w/ NKFM colleagues at the Enhance®Fitness Statewide Conference

Kristie King

National Kidney Foundation of Michigan

Senior Program Manager

I first met Kristie King in 2008 when the Michigan Department of Community Health was investing in Michigan communities to implement a portfolio of evidence based programs to build the health of older adults.  She and I were both working on the delivery of Enhance®Fitness, a community and evidence based exercise program for older adults.

Since that time, the National Kidney Foundation of Michigan has done an amazing job of building relationships with community partner sites and now has 25 locations in Southeast Michigan delivering this program.  Kristie and her team have trained over 100 instructors, many who are community members who came to the program as participants.  As challenging as it is to administer this program (train and manage staff, manage budgets, and recruit participants), Kristie will tell you the most difficult challenge is building relationships and encouraging community members to  participate in this life-changing program.

What does your work at the National Kidney Foundation of Michigan entail?

“In addition to overseeing the Enhance®Fitness program I am the lead liaison for the Inkster Partnership for A Healthier Community https://www.facebook.com/InksterPartnershipForAHealthierCommunity.

This coalition of nearly 40 organizations and residents works to support residents of Inkster in adopting and maintaining healthy behaviors.

While I’m not a resident of Inkster, I’ve worked hard to develop trust within the community.  Inkster has a rich history as a community of predominantly African American residents who settled in the area because of work opportunities at the Ford Motor Company.  Policies and practices restricted Dearborn to white employees and Inkster became a home for African Americans.  Inkster is a proud community working to address some critical community challenges, including the closing of their school district in recent years due to budget shortfalls.  Students now travel to four surrounding districts.  There is no grocery store within the community, leading to challenges with healthy food access.  How do you build a community with no school system and no grocery stores?  The coalition is working to develop garden programs, healthy food options, and access to health programs.  However, this is challenging because health is not top of mind for some residents.  Residents are concerned with meeting their basic needs; jobs, housing, education, and food.

My challenge is to use the resources that the National Kidney Foundation of Michigan and put them to the best use directly in the community.  This means working in partnership with community leaders.  People are not interested in my degrees or credentials.  In fact, sometimes those things prevent building trust.  You have to work with people.  As one pastor told me ‘We’re putting our trust in you, Kristie.  We’re not trusting your organization, the state health department, or anyone else.’  This is the key, delivering on what you say you’re going to do for people and communities. It cannot be short-term.”

Besides money, what is your biggest challenge?

Kristie:  “Money is not my biggest challenge.  The biggest barrier is getting to people who need these services the most.  How can we get people focused on taking care of their health when they are worried about rent, food, electricity, childcare, and education?  It takes really focused work to say, ‘let’s look at your resources and see how we can put them to use differently’.  That’s hard.  My approach with partners is to say, ‘This isn’t about an exchange of money, this is an exchange of resources’.  This approach communicates clearly that this isn’t about me helping you with funding I have, it’s us working together to bring about a change with what we all bring to the table; people, resources, space, commitment, and leadership.

What do you need more of?

“I need more staff, more committed people in all levels of the organization & community understanding what we’re trying to do.  The number of people in the community we’ve been able to serve are great, but it’s not enough.  We have to be in it for the long haul to really make a difference in people’s lives.  I make a lot of people mad because I demand that you be committed, to the people and to the program—this is long term change”.

Who’s work inside or outside of your industry or area of focus do you admire?

Kristie:  “There’s an organization on the Eastside called VODI-IMPACT http://voicesofdetroitinitiative.org/?page_id=583 it’s in what Detroiters call the ‘Old Holy Cross Hospital’.  I’ve worked with their Director Gayle Walters, who is actually transitioning away from this program as she’s relocating with her husband.  In the time we’ve worked together, we’re just kindred spirits.  You would think she has an MPH or a MSW, but she actually has a marketing background.  She is a master collaborator with many different partners.  She completely understands the social determinants of health and knows how to bring people together to get all kinds of services working together under one roof for residents.  VODI-Impact’s work needs to be studied and replicated—it’s just amazing”.